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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN 4
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the profile including funerals for prominent african-americans or commemorations of civil right events of which the clintons have been present. marking the hundredth anniversary of the largest african-american sorority. >> the idea that in the 21st century african-americans would wait in line to vote for ten hours while whites in an affluent precinct next door waited just ten minutes, or that african-americans would receive fliers telling them the wrong time and day to exercise their constitutional rights, that is not the america we expect or the america we want for our children. >> well, in the article in the "new york times" i mentioned, former virginia governor the first elected african-american governor in the country recalled a conversation with bill clinton in may this way. i'd be less than honest, the governor said, if i didn't tell you i came away convinced that there was no question about her running. joy reid is msnbc contributor and eugene robinson columnist at "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst. you're smiling, joy. i think it's for me, but maybe it's about t
midnight in south africa, the president made the announcement the civil rights icon and leader to the world had passed. >> i'm shere shepherd smith in york. we have learn ed from the president of south africa that the civil rights icon nelson mandela died a short time ago at the age of 95. mandela was the first black president of south africa and an enduring icon of the struggle against racial opposition. he died according to the announcement of the governor leaving the nation without the moral center at a time of growing dissatisfaction with the country's leaders. those words lead the new york sometimes article that came out moments ago. mr. mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason. by negotiating with captors after his release in 1990, mandela led the african national congress long a banned liberation movement to an lek to recall victory in 1994, first fully democratic election in that country's history. the new york times goes on, mandela served one term as the president and had not been seen in public since the year 2010 when the nation hosted the world cup socc
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
inspiration from him during the civil rights days here in america, and they prayed for him and gave him their support all those years when he was in prison. and, of course, it was a big event here when only a few months after he got out of prison, he came to visit this church. it does beg the question how you memorialize this man in just one sermon. we spoke earlier to senior pastor j. edgar boyd? >> i he dismantled with the prison cell with the help of those here in america and other parts of the world, the giant, the you know grateful and the wronged giant of apartheid. he disassembled it and brought about hope, and it brought about liberation not only for himself but for peace-loving people throughout south africa. >> new mexico new mexico had been out of the public eye for many years before he died but there are parishioners here who met him and we spoke to one of them? >> what a blissing it meet in gentleman, more than anything in life, the one who told us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive. he told us to forgive. no forgive and move on. yes, et cetera my her
that are starting to say, you know what, we're going to have to treat this almost like the civil rights movement. we're going to have to break this down into pieces and just keep moving the ball forward, but we cannot keep the status quo that we have right now. that doesn't work for anybody. >> the political equation is so interesting, i think, in this case because as you pointed out, margie, when you look at the polls and the demographics of the voting public, it just makes sense. now we're seeing chris christie, who of course is being named as a possible nominee in 2016, being accused of flip-flopping on in-state tuition for young, undocumented immigrants because his critics say he wants to run for president. he says he continues to support the idea, although he won't sign the specific bill that was passed by his state legislature. here's what he said yesterday about that flip-flopping charge. >> i am for tuition equality. as i said that night at the latino leadership, i am for tuition quality. i am not for adding tuition aid grants or adding undocumented out of state students to have rights that
? and the offensive rna mistweet with civil rights icon rosa parks declaring that she helped end racism. even though the rnc clarified the tweet, the firestorm continues. we'll speak with one of the people helping to lead the republicans' outreach to african-americans. face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] only aveeno® has an active naturals total soy formula that instantly brightens skin. and helps reduce the look of brown spots in just 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. try it for a month. then go ahead and try to spot a spot. aveeno® positively radiant. naturally beautiful results. of their type 2 diabetes with non-insulin victoza®. for a while, i took a pill to lower my blood sugar, but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza®. he said victoza® is different than pills. victoza® is proven to lower blood sugar and a1c. it's taken once-a-day, any time, and comes in a pen. and the needle is thin. victoza® is not for weight loss, but it may help you lose some weight. victoza® is an injectable prescription medicine that may improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 dia
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
or government defendants. thus attorneys' fees provisions are mostly found in civil right, environmental protection and other statutes. the provision in this bill differs from other congressional exceptions in that it would require anyone who loses a patent claim to pay the attorneys' fees of even large corporate defendants. this is a giant deterrent to genuine inventors from filing good-faith suits to defend their valid patents claims. therefore i urge the adoption of the watt-conyers substitute which would drop the losers pays provisions from the underlying bill while still including the key reforms that are present in the underlying bill and in the senate bill drafted by senate -- senator leahy. i urge adoption of the substitute and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from new york yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from california who has been a great person to work with on the judiciary committee and here on the floor of the house on this legis
up icing, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader said when he said, we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you would think they were from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not as foul citizens. we have interests in common. we've got to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. we forget we come from a common country with a common heritage, and for sure a common destiny. final thing i would say, and this is something that no labels is working to overcome, in this city today what all of you have to do every session in your state legislatures, forge principle compromised. the word cover my switchback in the day my father son used to be viewed as that's an act of statesmanship. today it is used as an act of betrayal. if you don't vote with your party, joe manchin was saying, 100% of the time, you are ostracized. there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv. so i'll just finish by recounting some word
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
a positive environment for civil society and to protect the rights of all ukrainians to express their views on the country's future in a constructive and peaceful manner. violence and intimidation should have no place in today's ukraine. to support the aspirations of the ukrainian people to achieve a prosperous european democracy. european integration is the surest course of economic growth and strengthening ukraine's democracy. thanks very much. >> here at the end of this briefing you can see it in its entirety on c-span that -- you can wor. live coverage here on c-span again now coming back at 5:00 p.m. eastern. we posted a question on our facebook page asking about your thoughts on congressional prod uctivity. a couple of responses. michael says, when you elect people who are contentious of government, you'll get that government. tracy offers the, hail hail term limits, hourly pay. congress has to me perks, and privileges. you can post your thoughts at facebook.com/bcspan, . coming up on c-span2, french opposition leader john prince walkup a -- will talk about his recent nuclear deal wit
think mats comply civil underway, a to does not answer to work is going on right now. there's a question in the significant issues are in the midwest due to a variety of factors. in addition to rely on the midwest, the midcontinent iso in the states we need to stay closely involved. >> do you feel like epa is listening to you on these issues because i do because in 2011 when they put out their rule, they include a consultative role for ferc if someone needs a fifth year. i believe that includes not just a fifth year for retrofit but also -- and not just for retrofit but also as they need to figure to bring transmission and before the plan can retire. we voted out a policy statement of how we would handle those. we haven't gotten them yet because it's not far enough along in the process. >> they tell us they're listening to us a lot. sometimes we don't think they are. >> i am very grateful that it comes all the meetings and i'vee a commitment from them that they will continue. but it's something that needs close vigilance. >> i was going to ask you about your priorities. i felt like mr. w
of the criminal defendants are introducing at trial is showing up in the civil commitment proceeding as a basis for keeping them in prison longer. if i torp ask you to raise your right hand. most of you might be able to do those. you might refuse. you can do so. why? because you have the capability of deciding toen gauge in action. is it right to say because i can describe genetically and neurologically your behavior and casual contribution to your behavior you don't have the ability to make choices about the behavior? well, that seems to be the theory that criminal defendants are introducing with they come to the criminal cocourtroom. they're saying t not voluntary. i explained how thin the concept of voluntary criminal law. we don't define it. are we just sleepwalking through life? it times to be what a lot of criminal defendants are saying. they are acting out of reflects and con polings. you can look at your family history and see if other people had been likely to do so. like wise, incompetency cases is showing up a lot. the idea is a same kind of involuntary more often with neurological.
kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if any
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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